Go to content Go to menu


bismarck_budweiser.png

From The Fatherland, April 7, 1915. —How much of the success of the Prohibitionists immediately after the First World War was due to the fact that their strongest opponents were German-Americans?

That Belgian Treaty

Monday, June 30, 2014


books?id=c2LnAAAAMAAJ&pg=PP11&img=1&zoom=3&hl=en&sig=ACfU3U3t8cHiQ7HCoO1lopER4vtLEejKPQ&ci=45%2C101%2C870%2C232&edge=0
books?id=c2LnAAAAMAAJ&pg=PP14&img=1&zoom=3&hl=en&sig=ACfU3U085yC6N57K40vrrVf_OlLobYOZtg&ci=77%2C639%2C866%2C653&edge=0

books?id=c2LnAAAAMAAJ&pg=PP15&img=1&zoom=3&hl=en&sig=ACfU3U2fUkxsH95BtLHARaiZjJsxiyTnQQ&ci=53%2C124%2C857%2C1180&edge=0

From The Fatherland, February 10, 1915. —This seems to be typical of the sophistry by which German apologists justified the invasion of Belgium in the First World War. It would have been far better to stick to “it was regrettably necessary” than to spin out these useless and unconvincing arguments, which make the case seem even worse by suggesting that German thinkers are altogether blind to the simplest moral principles.